ED MAP: Insights Blog

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The Days of High-Priced Course Materials Are Over

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The evidence is building, and it’s becoming harder to ignore — an ever-increasing number of institutions are making the switch to Ed Map’s ALL IN MODEL™ (AIM) and making course materials affordable. Take two minutes to watch the video below to learn how to move beyond the traditional college bookstore. From holding publishers to the best absolute possible price, accessing a multi-verse of course materials on or before the first day of class, to supporting your institution’s mission!     We all know the campus bookstore and being shocked at the top sticker price of course materials. The prices…

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10.10.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Student-Centered Educational Software. “It’s not hard to see the connection between Gallup-Purdue’s findings and Tinto’s (or with common sense and intuition, for that matter). Solid empirical evidence suggests that the best way to affect medium- and long-term outcomes for students is to give them reason to feel that they are part of an academic community of people who are committed to helping them succeed at learning things that actually matter. There are lots of ways that educational software could facilitate this, in traditional classrooms and even in scaled-up approaches (like MOOCs) that emphasize access….

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10.3.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Meritocracy in Obama’s Gilded Age. “But the problem with Obama’s story is not only that it blinds us to the structural inequality generated by higher education. The story also makes it difficult to appreciate what’s worth defending about even our deeply flawed university system.” How “Working From Home” Became “Just Working.” “The shift away from the office being the default place where work happens has its plusses and minuses. On the minus side, we have totally demolished the zone between work and home. We are always working….

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9.26.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The No-Censorship Approach to Life. “To say that we can’t ban speech is, in a sense, easy. To say what follows next is very, very hard. This brings me to that second essential point: How students today grapple with ideas, with thoughts and viewpoints in the myriad ways available to them, will determine who they are. Of course, they will never completely resolve this process; it is too complex for rules or clear guides. They will make many errors, and feel embarrassed looking back. Or they will feel…

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9.19.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Thinking Outside the Box. “Education is nested inside a series of boxes. There is one box we call the course. Another is called the semester. Yet a third is the school year. Then, too, there is the degree.  Credit hours, departments, majors, these, too, are boxes. What happens when we think outside these boxes? No longer forced to think in terms of courses, semesters, school years, or degrees, we are free to imagine other possibilities. Instead of the semester, we might think in terms of micro-lectures, lessons, practice exercises, modules, or missions. Ditto…

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9.12.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. One week of bad stories about higher education financing, and I feel fine. “Somedays it’s hard to discern signals about an emerging topic.  Other times they just fight with each other to leap across the transom. Today the subject is higher education finances in crisis.  One of the datapoints is personal, while the rest are public information.” Emerging OER research discipline. “One of the things I’ve become increasingly interested in is how the OER discipline emerges. Having lived through it, you get to see the field evolve….

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9.6.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. How to Think Like Shakespeare. “You take it for granted that Olympic athletes and professional musicians must practice relentlessly to perfect their craft. Why should you expect the craft of thought to require anything less disciplined? Fierce attention to clear and precise writing is the essential tool for you to foster independent judgment. That is rhetoric.” Feds Target ‘Predatory’ Publishers. “The complaint, filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada, marks the first time the FTC has gone after what are often known as…

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8.29.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students. “Flipped Strategy #1: Six Thinking Hats ‘Six Thinking Hats’ is an approach to guide and focus students’ thinking, expand their perspectives, and generate creative approaches to solving problems (de Bono, 1999). To implement this strategy, present students with six different colored “hats” to wear as they analyze a situation. The color of the hat reflects the role or perspective you want students to take as they work through the problem: white (data, facts), red (feelings, emotions), yellow (positive view, benefits),…

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8.22.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. TechCrunch: “EdTech – 2-17’s big, untapped and safe investor opportunity”. “The challenge for ‘scaling’ in EdTech is not fundamentally about new technology. It is about finding out effective teaching practices and professional development efforts that leverage EdTech. The scaling or diffusion of innovations by the nature of education will be long and complex – not at all fast and disruptive in the same way as online payment processing or similar FinTech innovations.” Three Principles of Learning Resources. “As we form partnerships with vendors, we have learned that…

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8.15.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Opening the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2015-2016. “Most higher education faculty are unaware of open educational resources (OER) – but they are interested and some are willing to give it a try. Survey results, using responses of over 3,000 U.S. faculty, show that OER is not a driving force in the selection of materials – with the most significant barrier being the effort required to find and evaluate such materials. Use of open resources is low overall, but somewhat higher for large enrollment introductory-level courses.”

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8.8.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Algorithms in Use: Evaluating Teachers and “Personalizing” Learning (Part 2). “Even though the rhetoric of ‘personalized learning’ mythologizes the instructional materials and learning as student-centered, algorithms (mostly proprietary and unavailable for inspection) written by programmers making choices about what students should learn next are in control. ‘Personalized learning’ is student-centered in its reliance on lessons tailored to ability and performance differences among students. And the work of teachers is student-centered in coaching, instructing, and individualizing their attention as well as monitoring small groups working together. All of that…

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8.1.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Feds Soften Distance Ed Rule. “In what observers called a ‘significant’ departure from previous drafts, however, the proposed rule does not require states to conduct an ‘active review’ of out-of-state colleges — a provision that was in previous drafts that many distance education groups criticized for placing an undue burden on states but consumer protection groups argued was important to prevent fraudulent colleges from taking advantage of students.” Is Transferring to Two-Year Colleges a Good Option for Struggling Four-Year Students? “Using 2005-06 to 2007-08 student cohorts, the…

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7.25.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Guidelines for Quality Assurance and Accreditation. “Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have emerged as an educational innovation with the potential to increase access to and improve the quality of education. Different stakeholders in education view MOOCs from different perspectives. However, there are common questions related to the quality of these courses and to the granting of equivalent credits. This document provides a set of guidelines designed to support decision making about the sorts of quality measures that are appropriate in different contexts.” (Download site) Should Colleges Really…

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7.18.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. UC Davis Lessons: Open is as open does. “If the open source community wants to have broader influence in higher education, including a greater number of LMS adoptions of Moodle or Sakai, then I would suggest that there should be more emphasis on outside-in perspectives and ‘practical openness’, and less emphasis on pure software licensing and development models.” Welfare Reform, For-Profit Education, and Community Colleges. “From the standpoint of 2016, we have a piecemeal but large and growing non-credit operation at most community colleges that has emerged as…

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7.11.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The importance of faculty in the higher education experience. “The new role for faculty is to show how to be a practitioner in the field – be a carpenter, a physicist, etc. More, it is to show how you try, fail, learn, etc. To show the way you think about problems. To be open with your mistakes and your failings as well as your successes. To be a part of the learning community, the one who forges ahead, the one who discovers a new path. From the institutional perspective, the shift…

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7.4.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The Importance of Scientific Management Training. “For decades, scholars have juxtaposed academe with industry as though they were completely different entities. When the opportunities within the two sectors are understood, however, it becomes clear that the skills necessary for success in each are more similar than they appear. Management skills, in particular, are relevant to the primary investigator (PI) role, a fact even our faculty miss. As a result, most graduate and postdoctoral training programs lack significant opportunities to properly prepare their trainees for one of the most…

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6.27.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Draining The Semantic Swamp of “personalized Learning” – A View from Silicon Valley (Part 1). “At one end of the continuum are teacher-centered lessons and programs within the traditional age-graded school using behavioral approaches that seek efficient and effective learning to make children into knowledgeable, skilled, and independent adults who can successfully enter the labor market, thrive, and become adults who help their communities. These approaches (and ultimate aims for public schools) have clear historical underpinnings dating back nearly a century. At the other end of the continuum…

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6.20.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Sakai Is Probably Healthier Than You Think. “I was at the Apereo conference this month and got to see a brief presentation on the forthcoming Sakai 11. What I saw was consistent with the picture we’re getting from Github. I was surprised at the amount of progress in this release. I did not get a deep dive or even a demo, so these are only first impressions. But it looked to me like the development team is finally making major progress on a much-needed user experience overhaul as well as a…

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6.13.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Report Slams Accreditor of ‘Incapable’ of Assessing College Quality. “A study released on Monday by the Center for American Progress found that the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools has continued to accredit 17 institutions or companies that are under state or federal investigation, taking little or no action to penalize them.” Final Push for State Authorization Rule. “But that requirement could be softened by a recognition of initiatives that aim to simplify the process by which colleges become authorized to offer their programs in other states, such…

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6.6.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. SRI’s Study on Gates Personalized Learning Grants Is Out. “There are no conclusive wins here. This is not a robot-tutor-in-the-sky moment. A few programs did well here and there. A handful produced promising incremental gains. But this is not a report that screams, ‘Wow, adaptive courseware works!’ The most you can say is that adaptive learning looks like it could be another arrow in the quiver that helps out in some situations—like developmental math courses at two-year colleges, for example.” UNC Press to Offer Publishing Services for Professors’…

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5.30.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The Second Power of Open. “Many conversations about open education begin with cost savings because open is such a powerful lever for making immediate and dramatic progress on issues related to affordability. And because many more people understand cost than understand pedagogy, I don’t expect this will ever change. That’s fine – radically improving affordability is a completely worthy and honorable goal. Perhaps we should start talking about open pedagogy as the ‘second power of open.’ Perhaps that language, which has a clear and specific referent, would help…

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5.23.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Big Brains, Small Minds. “As the sciences rightly grow, a free society must ensure that criticism of the sciences grows apace. Effective criticism depends on distance, in this case on an unshakeable difference, between the humanities and the STEM fields. That is not to say that STEM researchers can’t or shouldn’t be experts in the humanities, but rather that the work that the humanities do should not be judged by the metrics of hard science. As Aristotle, Plato’s most famous student, suggests at the beginning of the Nicomachean Ethics, ‘precision…

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5.16.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. In Which I Consider Resorting to a T-Shirt Cannon. “Second, they demonstrate that, as I’ve argued here serially, “transfer is workforce.” Humanities majors at community colleges generally intend to transfer for four-year degrees and often beyond.  Many of the best-paying jobs require a bachelor’s degree or more. Given the steadily-increasing cost gap between two-year and four-year schools, the financial argument for transfer is getting stronger, and students are responding rationally. Politicians who look at “workforce” programs (that is, terminal associate’s or certificates) as “real” and transfer programs as…

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5.9.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Faculty Members Must Play Their Part in Keeping Teaching Costs Under Control. “Structural modeling allows academic departments to examine the characteristics and costs of different teaching methods, to shape their portfolios of course offerings and instructor types, and to identify courses for redesign. Over time, the models will spur faculty members and administrators to develop better learning measures and then hone their own intuition about the cost-effectiveness of alternative approaches. In other words, universities will come to learn that, contrary to the traditional narrative, teaching costs can be…

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5.2.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Rubik’s Cube and School Reform (Part1). “The Rubik Cube is complicated; school reform is complex. I and many others have pointed out the distinction between complicated and complex. This post offers another distinction, one that is crucial for policymakers, practitioners, parents, and researchers to consider before adopting and implementing policies in school curriculum, organization, governance, and pedagogy that touch children and youth. That distinction is: changing school structures and culture to reshape classroom pedagogy is far harder to do than solving Rubik’s Cube.” Why EdTech Is A…

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4.25.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. 9 Reasons Why Digital Capabilities Matter. “The reasons why our digital capabilities matter is an ever-evolving mix. Here are 9 reasons that I consistently reference when thinking and talking about digital capabilities: Career Enhancement & Employability – The more you are able to utilize digital technologies, the greater chance you have for your career to be positively impacted by your overall capabilities with all things digital.” We Don’t Need a ‘Revolution’ to Improve Teaching. “In this case, as much as I agree with Prof. Wieman about the…

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4.18.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. I Was a Student Protester. “The protesters have just as much a right to free speech, or its private institutional equivalent, as anybody else. They are putting themselves out there without having the benefit of years of professional education, lobbyist training, or what one hopes to gain in life — sheer maturity and balance that can only come with experience. They may suffer some consequences. If so, they are learning something about the real kind of civil disobedience” Siri … Please Stick to Just Being a Catalyst….

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4.11.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Ability to ignore is a key part of paying attention, Johns Hopkins study finds. “In fact, the more information participants were able to ignore, the faster they found the target. Although trying to disregard distractions might initially slow people down, the researchers concluded that over time, people are more efficient when they know what’s not worth paying attention to. The ability to ignore is a key part of the ability to pay attention, the researchers said.” What WALL-E Teaches Us About Adaptive and Personalized Learning. “Our world…

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4.4.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. No, Not New York City… “Most community colleges were established during a ten-year spread from the early sixties to the early seventies. That was roughly the peak of the postwar distributed-production model. In the 70’s, the cities now seen as the powerhouses of the economy and culture were considered crime-ridden embarrassments. Growth was in the suburbs of smaller cities. Community colleges were ways to bring the rapidly-growing provinces into the larger economy and culture. An industry comprised of hundreds (eventually, over a thousand) local outposts all around the…

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3.28.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Chatbots for First-Year Student Success. “One thing that stuck with me from Marcia’s presentation was that the people who need the help are often the people least likely to ask for it, because they are afraid asking a stupid question will mark them an outsider. So you have a set of students who know How to College, and often are quite aggressive with getting their question answered. And then you have students that really need the answers who are largely silent, and if they seek help tend to…

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3.21.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. A Typology of “Free Tuition.” “Type 9: Net free for some, Based on income This is the kind of free tuition that already exists widely in America and Canada: where tuition is charged to all, and need- or income-based grants and tax subsidies are available so that some students at least receive as much on non-repayable aid as they pay in tuition. One of the reasons that ‘free community college’ programs in Tennessee and Oregon have been so cheap to implement is that existing federal and state programs already…

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3.14.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Stuck With Profit. “The commission, however, decided that the proposed structure would move too much of Grand Canyon’s academic operations to the for-profit division. HLC said its requirements ‘do not allow for an institution to outsource all or the majority of its basic functions related to academic and student support services and curriculum development, even where the contract between the parties indicates that the accredited institution provides oversight of those services.’” Non-Faculty Educators and Zero-Sum Thinking. “As teaching is increasingly mediated by digital platforms, and as the…

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3.7.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Students Shouldn’t Have to Choose Between Books and Food. “While this is a good start, colleges need to build on such efforts. Hunger is a symptom of poverty, and a holistic approach is the only way to eradicate it. Those going hungry should not only get access to food on campus but should be directed toward community resources.” Centers for Teaching & Learning As University Red Teams. “Center for Teaching and Learning already play many roles on our campuses. They provide resources, support, and community for faculty…

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2.29.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The non-Uberization of education. “I think there will be aspects of (really, really for want of a better phrase) Uberization of education. Indeed they’re already here, and are just part of the changing approach to workforce. … Similarly the online tutoring model which seems to be such a revelation to many, is already underway. I think this will expand, particularly in combination with OERs and MOOCs. But I suspect it will be largely in conjunction with higher education, not in competition to it.” Small Grants, Big Impact….

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2.22.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Building a Bridge Between Engineering and the Humanities. “We know that engineering and the humanities differ not just in subject matter but in the very kinds of thinking they encourage. So the question is not just what information from each domain might be useful to the other, but also what each could learn by imagining the world in a whole new way.” Every Student Gets a Mentor. “The goal of the mentoring program is to help liberal arts students navigate that world. They will seek out mentors…

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2.15.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Looking Anew at How Teachers Teach. “Each tradition has its own goals (transmit knowledge to next generation vs. helping children grow into full human beings); practices (teacher-centered vs. student-centered); and desired outcomes (knowledgeable and skilled adults ready to enter the labor market and society versus an outcome of moral and civic engaged adults who use their knowledge and skills to help themselves and their communities). No evidence, then or now, has confirmed advocates’ claims for either tradition. These are choices anchored in beliefs. While posing these traditions as opposites, ……

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2.8.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Learning Studio and OpenClass End-of-Life: Pearson is getting out of LMS market. “So what platforms and technology products do meet corporate goals? Barnes said that Pearson does courseware really well, with over 12 million students on these platforms overall and approximately 2 million per day. He sees large distinctions between content-agnostic LMS solutions and courseware. Courseware might require certain features that overlap LMS features, but the fundamentals of what’s being delivered goes well beyond content management store, calendaring, and other LMS basics to include instrumentation of content and science-based…

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2.1.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. State Spending on Higher Education Continues Slow Improvement. “But even with those examples, the spending trend over five years is another small sign of improvement, said the survey’s authors: Thirty-five states are spending more on higher education this year than they did five years ago, according to the Grapevine project’s figures. Last year’s results showed that half of the states were spending less than they were five years earlier.” ‘A Trust Network’ for Scholarship. “A group of liberal arts colleges and research universities are exploring how they…

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1.25.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. How MIT Plans to Develop Scalable, Differentiated Instruction. “The pedagogy behind Fly-by-Wire modules is based on literature establishing the effectiveness of mastery-based learning, frequent assessment, and rapid feedback. These modules will specify the logic and linkages of learning outcomes, assessment, and targeted feedback, and will feed into the Fly-by-Wire technology component.” Zombie Ideas Again: “The Learning Pyramid.” “Why does the belief in the ‘Learning Pyramid’ persist in the face of so much counter-evidence? The zombie effect about the ‘Pyramid,’ and here is where I am speculating, reinforces…

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1.18.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Book review: The Internet is not the answer (Andrew Keen, 2015). “If I understand Keen correctly, it would seem as if he suggests that understanding not only how technological advances disrupted these industries, but also the reasons for these disruptions, may allow us to not have too many stars in our eyes considering the impact of the Internet.” Selling the English Major. “He said the most important takeaway from the Georgetown research and similar studies was that the value of the bachelor’s degree — across major fields…

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1.11.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The 3 Things I’ll Say About EdTech in 2016. “People who work in higher education understand that the most important aspect of the undergraduate experience is learning how to learn. Tomorrow’s jobs will be different from today’s. Those able to succeed in the cognitive economy will have a strong foundation of analytical and social skills. The ability to gather and synthesize information, to make persuasive arguments using evidence, and to build strong relationships and coalitions across cultural, organizational and geographical barriers will determine success in the labor market.”

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1.4.16 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. How Strayer University’s new president plans to move the for-profit college ahead. “We believe that coaching is an important part of the experience. Our previous approach really had coaching set outside of the classroom, kind of a separate vertical. You’ve got your classroom experience and separate from that you’ve got your success coach. What we’re testing this term in a few sections is a model that actually has an instructor who serves as both a content instructor as well as a coach for the first year. A lot…

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12.28.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Development Costly but Delivery Variable: Costing and Pricing Online Offerings. “As we continue to improve the total student experience at a distance there will continue to be new costs we haven’t even thought about yet, whether for technology, innovative pedagogical approaches, student support, or student engagement activities. Rapid improvements in learning and content management systems will reduce costs as we know them today. However, as I mentioned above, new technologies will add costs that we cannot fully predict today.” An Idea Offered Freely to Candidates. “So, here’s…

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12.21.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. “Good” and “Successful” Teaching: Where Does the Student Enter the Picture? “F & R point out that learning, like teaching, can also be distinguished between ‘good’ and ‘successful.’ The above examples of student proficiency on the theory of evolution, the Declaration of Independence, and prime numbers demonstrate ‘successful’ learning. “Good” learning, however, requires other factors to be in place. “Good” learning occurs when the student is willing to learn and puts forth effort, the student’s family, peers, and community support learning, the student has the place, time, and resources…

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12.14.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Exclusive: University of Phoenix moving from homegrown platform to Blackboard Learn Ultra. “The driver for the University of Phoenix to move away from their homegrown system to Blackboard is an initiative called Project Bedrock. The concept is that they view a pyramid of functionality, where the bottom level is necessary infrastructure that can be provided with a commodity SaaS approach (e.g. HR systems with little differentiation), and the top level is unique value-add functionality where it is worth investing in a custom solution (e.g. learning analytics targeted at individual students…

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12.7.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Students’ role in learning analytics: From data-objects to collaborators. “Considering the amount of student data higher education institutions have access to, and the fiduciary duty of higher education to address concerns about sometimes appalling rates of student failure (Slade & Prinsloo, 2013), lack of effective or appropriate student support and institutional failures – higher education cannot afford not to collect and analyse student data. Knowing more about our students raises however a number of ethical issues such as whether they know that we are observing them and analysing…

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11.30.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Beyond Textbooks and OER: reflecting on #OpenEd15. “The real problem with textbooks, though, is that focusing on them is focusing on content. When learning, and open education, should focus more on process (a conversation on this from a year ago across my blog, Jim Groom’s, Mike Caulfield’s and David Wiley’s). However, the conversation has evolved. People at OpenEd15 talked to us about open textbook adoption that doesn’t only focus on content, but also the process of creation and sharing. Questions of flexibility are being raised readily, even if…

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11.23.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Small Changes in Teaching: The Minutes Before Class. “The more time I spend with students in that brief space before the start of class, the more I recognize that those warm-up minutes actually represent a fertile opportunity. I can use the time to enhance the learning that will take place in the hour that follows, to build a more positive atmosphere for class discussion, or simply to get to know my students a little better.” Going Beyond the Pilot Project. “This week, however, APLU is taking that…

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11.16.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. What Open-Access Publishing Actually Costs. “At nonprofit publishers, sustainability can take on a different meaning. For the Open Library of the Humanities, Mr. Eve said, it means the ability to cover costs. Unlike commercial publishers, nonprofit open-access journals don’t have a traditional profit margin — but they also don’t break even. At the Open Library of the Humanities, surplus money goes toward a safety net, to be used for unforeseen costs. At PLOS, surplus money goes back into the organization.” Are Elite College Courses Better? “The push…

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11.9.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Edtech’s Next Big Disruption Is The College Degree. “Enter the second wave of education’s technology revolution: the New Credentialing. In the past few years, credentials such as online badges, course certificates and dynamic assessments have started to gain wide acceptance — and, in some fields, such as technology, are perhaps even preferred in certain instances because they offer more insight into hard skills — as a primary currency in the world of work and careers. This trend has been sparked by an implied demand, and because the communities aiming to…

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11.2.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Missing the Mark on Enrollment and Revenue: No Easy Fix. “That most colleges reported hitting their enrollment or revenue targets heartens Rick Staisloff, who consults with colleges on finance and strategy. But significant shares of all respondents — 40 percent of public and 42 percent of private colleges — increased spending on financial aid, and that worries him. So does the fact that more than a third of private colleges this year reported a higher discount rate, the average share of tuition covered by institutional aid. Those are…

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10.26.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The Rise of Antisocial Deconstructivism. “In the course of the conversation, we spontaneously came up with a term that we both like and that seemed to resonate with the audience: antisocial deconstructivism. It’s the approach of breaking learning down into teeny, tiny bits, tied to fine-grained competencies and micro-assessments, that students learn on their own by following a prescription that is created for them, possibly with the help of a robot. … There are times when antisocial deconstructivism is an appropriate pedagogical technique. … Any situation in which…

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10.19.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Instructure Files for IPO. “Also not a big surprise, but the numbers in the report show big growth. Subscription revenue rose 72% from 2013 to 2014. Coincidentally, Edutechinica just published its 3rd annual LMS Data Update. As you can see, Canvas went through the roof in US higher ed while the other major LMS players were either flat or close to it” Yes, I did say that Knewton is “selling snake oil.” “But much of what Jose says, at least to the media, is the opposite. No…

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10.12.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Tough on Colleges, Arne Duncan Bequeaths Record of Advocacy for Students. “During Mr. Duncan’s tenure, the department eliminated banks from the student-loan system, simplified the process of applying for financial aid, and expanded options for income-based repayment of student loans. It toughened regulations to curb recruiting abuses by for-profit colleges and aligned with the White House to push for greater consumer information in all sectors of higher education.” It’s Not a Game: Future Secretaries Must Respect Higher Education’s Complexity. “Higher education today is about so much more…

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10.5.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. More Than a Postdoc. “The program gives recent graduates increasingly valuable teaching experience to take out onto the job market. Preceptors also play a role in the university’s newly revised general education program, which includes seminars required of all first-year students, since these are the courses the fellows tend to design and teach.” Rethinking State Support for Higher Ed. “Improving the sufficiency and fairness of state allocations for higher education will require shedding more light on within-state funding distributions. It also will also demand a more careful…

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9.28.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Somebody’s Gotta Do It. “That’s why I recently made a commitment to start teaching online, beginning in the fall of 2016. My plan is to create a rigorous and engaging online U.S. history survey course while I’m still in a position to dictate terms. After all, if I create a respectable, popular class that takes advantage of the Internet to do things that can’t be done in person, then it will be harder for future online courses at my university (or elsewhere for that matter) to fail to…

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9.21.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. White House Unveils College Scorecard That Replaces Its Scuttled Ratings Plan. “The new College Scorecard site, which replaces an older one of the same name, features a more modern and user-friendly design and some new information about colleges not previously available on the predecessor site or from other federal data sources. Notably, for each college, it includes measurements of students’ earnings six and 10 years after they started at a college and data showing the proportion of the college’s students who are repaying their student loans.” Time Is Right…

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9.14.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Why Moodle Matters. “And yet no other academic LMS solution comes close to Moodle in terms of worldwide deployments and learners enrolled. Even if you’re a US college or university, consider several reasons why Moodle matters. Stories Matter, So Make Yours Better. “Embrace conflicts and resolutions. Every story must have conflict. It’s not a story without it. Use conflict and resolution—overcoming some obstacle, solving a difficult problem, changing direction or discovering something unexpected—in every story. Doing so will ensure your stories have a clear point of view,…

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9.7.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. CliffNotes for Credit. “No writing or presenting of any kind, no interaction with an instructor beyond being able to ask questions electronically, no interaction with other students taking the course, no expectation of any kind of higher order thinking, analysis, or grappling with big questions, no inspiring students to want to learn more by showing them the deep and powerful insights into our social world that sociology can provide. I can’t imagine any student being inspired by this course to want to know more about sociology, and I…

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8.31.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The MOOC revolution that wasn’t. “Although MOOCs were hardly new in 2012—the term had been coined four years earlier by Canadian educators to describe their experiments with “connected,” open online learning—MOOCs became wildly popular (and wildly hyped) in no small part because their appearance in the popular press coincided with several key trends in higher education, most notably the rising cost of tuition, growing levels of student loan debt, and pressure for everyone to have some post-secondary education.” Improv-ing Grad School Life. “To do improv is to…

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8.24.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Fewer Good Jobs for College Grads? Not So, Says New Study. “The novelty of the study is how it categorizes jobs. Instead of grouping jobs by industry (the type of employer someone works for), the report groups them by occupation (what someone does on the job). To explain why that matters, the report uses the home health industry as an example. Home health would be categorized as a low-wage industry because the bulk of its workers are low-paid. But it also employs some high-paid workers, like registered nurses…

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8.17.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Search for Success. “To earn the scholarship, first-year students must attend a weekly speaker series and small group sessions with peer mentors, complete 10 hours of service a semester, have 30 hours of courses completed before their sophomore year, have a GPA of 2.0 or higher, and attend one to two network events each semester.” Aid That Grows With Tuition. “Lower student debt and increased retention: those are the results the University of Dayton says it’s seeing two years after putting in place an unusual tuition strategy….

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8.10.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. A College Without Classes. “Called competency-based education, this new model looks at what students should know when they complete a certain degree, and allows them to acquire that knowledge by independently making their way through lessons. It also allows students who come into school with knowledge in a certain area to pass tests to prove it, rather than forcing them to take classes and pay for credits on information they already know.” An Ignored Conflict of Interest. “Conflicts of interest are inherent in faculty control over curriculum….

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8.3.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Blackboard Ultra and Other Product and Company Updates. “Ultra is much more than a usability makeover and much more ambitious than is commonly understood: There is a sense in the market that Ultra is Blackboard’s attempt to catch up with Instructure’s ease of use. While there is some truth to that, it would be a mistake to think of Ultra as just that. In fact, it is a very ambitious re-architecture that, for example, has the ability to capture a rich array of real-time learning analytics data. These substantial…

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7.27.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Building a Better Discussion. “In the book, he draws upon his sociology training to analyze the classroom as a space where certain social norms operate, and he considers how those norms shape our efforts to spark discussions. Social norms in general have a powerful influence on behavior, he argues. Consider, for example, our behavior in elevators. … Likewise, he argues, students come into our courses having internalized certain norms about how to behave in a classroom. Too often, those internalized norms trump faculty expectations for student participation —…

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7.20.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Promising Research Results On Specific Forms Of Adaptive Learning / ITS. “These are very encouraging results for the field of ITS and a subset of Adaptive Learning. I view the results not as saying adaptive learning is the way to go but rather as there is evidence that adaptive learning working applied in a tutoring role can improve academic performance in the right situations.” Beyond the Transcript. “The Lumina Foundation has kicked in $1.27 million for NASPA to partner with the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO)…

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7.13.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Some Thoughts From Across the Pond. “We’re trying to figure out how to make research open access. The UK has been on an accelerated timetable compared to the US, but there’s still a lot that’s up in the air in terms of how it will be funded and whether existing commercial publishers will carry on with open access as a new and profitable business model; meanwhile we’re sorting out what libraries can  contribute and whether our support could lead to something more equitable.” Green Shoots. “In broad…

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7.6.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Prior Learning Assessments Done Right. “This is not personalized in the sense trying to figure out which institution-defined competencies you can check off on you way to an institution-defined collection of competencies that they call a “degree.” Rather, it’s an effort to have credentialed experts look at what you’ve done and what you know to find existing strengths that deserve to be recognized and credentialed.” Google Classroom Addresses Major Barrier To Deeper Higher Ed Adoption. “Google directly addresses the course roster management in their announcement; in fact,…

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6.29.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Business Can Pay to Train Its Own Work Force. “This blurring of the distinction between education and job-skill training isn’t simply a fight over academic priorities. It’s a fight about who pays the cost of doing business: the companies that profit, or some combination of workers and taxpayers. The more we’re willing to countenance a redefinition of job training as education, the more we ask society to shoulder what were once business expenses.” EdTech Advice for Sweet Briar. “Saying that ‘technology is not important’ may be stating…

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6.22.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Testing. “But there are problems, created for the most part by state actions and regulations that are clearly counterproductive. We have an overemphasis on testing beginning at the third grade level. These tests, tied to the common core, are 90 minutes long (longer for kids with special needs who get extended time to complete examinations) and are a major source of stress for kids. In the early grades we should be fostering a love of learning and not an anxiety over too much testing. I am a person…

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6.15.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Take Note. “The results (see below) mostly confirmed that hypothesis; students in the control group scored the equivalent of a letter grade higher than the students texting about topics unrelated to the lecture. Yet students who texted about the contents of the video, regardless of how often they did so, earned scores that were nearly on par with students in the control group.” 2 + 2 Shouldn’t = 5. “At most universities it takes 100 to 130 units to earn a degree. Students with 80 to 90…

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6.8.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Wisconsin Lawmakers Take Aim at Tenure and Shared Governance. “In addition to eliminating tenure from state laws, the legislative committee approved a measure that would allow the university to lay off tenured faculty members without declaring financial exigency — for example, when the university discontinued an academic program. While the outlines of shared governance would remain in state statute, lawmakers voted to insert language that would make all faculty, student, and staff advice ‘subordinate to’ the authority of the campus and system leaders. ‘That’s a seismic change,’ said…

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6.1.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Universities Behaving Badly. “So there’s some excitement being generated this month with respect to the OECD’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO).  Roughly speaking, AHELO is the higher education equivalent of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), or the Program for International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).  It consists of a general test of critical thinking skills (based on the Collegiate Learning Assessment), plus a couple of subject-matter tests that test competencies in specific disciplines. AHELO completed its pilot phase a couple of years ago, and…

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5.25.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Education Dept. Proposes Reining In Deals Between Colleges and Banks. “Among other things, the department’s new rules would: Prohibit colleges from requiring students to open a new account to deposit funds. Keep banks that form partnerships with colleges from assessing overdraft fees to students. Require that a new student’s existing bank account be presented as the default option for depositing funds.” The Teaching Compact. “I, as the professor, am not primarily interested in assessment. I want you to leave each class, and the course over all, curious,…

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5.18.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Debt-Free Catches On. “Debt-free college, if it does indeed capture a high-profile spot on the Democratic 2016 campaign trail, would be among the most ambitious higher education proposals offered by a presidential candidate in a few decades of election cycles. Although rising levels of student loan debt have increasingly become a popular topic in presidential and congressional elections over the past several cycles, the solutions have been less sweeping than debt-free college.” Brick by Brick. “Educause hoped to consider whether existing learning management systems can support higher…

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5.11.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Attainment, Completion, and the Trouble in Measuring Them Both. “Sometimes the challenges in unifying data start with developing a standard set of definitions. While some people might use ‘attainment’ and ‘completion’ interchangeably, they are not synonymous. Attainment measures ‘the highest level of education that individuals have completed,’ while ‘completion’ describes ‘how many people finish the programs they begin.’ One could hold the completion rate steady, but expand enrollment in order to increase attainment. Likewise, one could hold enrollment steady, but expand completions to increase attainment. The two are…

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5.4.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Bringing the Liberal Arts to Engineering Education. “We believe that integrating the liberal arts in engineering education positions future engineers to be successful at anticipating, defining, and solving these problems. Such integrated curricula provide what Richard K. Miller, president of Olin College of Engineering, has referred to as the “missing basics” of engineering education, which include design and creativity, teamwork and interdisciplinary thinking, and understanding the social, political, historical, and economic context of a project — all the hallmarks of a liberal-arts education. Indeed, these traits are recognized by…

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4.27.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Community-College Gathering Takes Up Challenges, Familiar and Fanciful. “Expanding opportunities for students to major in STEM fields is a big priority for many community colleges, which continue to hear from employers that there aren’t nearly enough graduates with the technical skills they require. Colleges have been scrambling to upgrade training programs to tailor them to local industry needs. Privately, though, some community-college officials complained here that companies were cutting back their own job-training programs and expecting colleges to keep up with the constantly changing technical training required for…

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4.20.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. State Spending on Higher Education Shows ‘Sizable’ Increase. “The buds of a recovery in state and local support for higher education that appeared in 2013 blossomed even more in the 2014 fiscal year, a new report shows. But the effects of the Great Recession still linger, according to the State Higher Education Executive Officers association.Even with what the group called a ‘sizable’ 5.7 percent increase in spending over the previous year’s figure, the $86.3-billion in overall state and local funding remains below 2008-11 levels in inflation-adjusted dollars.”

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4.13.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Overcode by MIT Scales Up Automatic Grading. “Researchers at MIT have developed a new system to better manage computer science assignments handed in by thousands of students. The system, named OverCode, will help instructors manage their classes in a faster and more effective manner. OverCode reviews online homework at scale by analyzing and comparing student’s code assignments to identify where these align and where they depart in their solution approach. The program then creates several templates of techniques that arrive to the right solution and groups students’ assignments according…

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4.6.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The List. “Simply releasing the watch list doesn’t amount to upfront quality control or regulation; at best, it’s a sort of rearguard action designed for damage control. That’s fine, as far as it goes, but we need much more.  The discussion needs to shift from “for profits good” vs. “for profits bad.” Let’s restrict the realm of competition to actual quality, and then let the best providers win, whoever they are.  In the meantime, I’m glad the list will be public. The public needs to know.” The…

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3.30.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The End of College? “In the long run, the case for higher education as a public good will be stronger if higher education organizations make the best possible use of public dollars, in a way that’s strongly aligned with the average citizen’s intense desire to provide an affordable, high quality learning experience for his or her children. Information technology will undoubtedly be an important part of achieving that goal.” Growing Your Own. “But the basic impulse still strikes me as right. Struggling areas need entrepreneurs of all…

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3.23.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Stanford Chief Wants Higher Ed to Be ‘Affordable, Accessible, Adaptable.’ “To be effective, online learning must overcome several challenges, he said. It has to help students learn better, and it needs to offer a customized experience. ‘In a live classroom, a good instructor can see what works and what doesn’t,’ Mr. Hennessy said. Online instruction might be able to do that using real-time data and analytics on how students are engaging (or not) with the material. ‘We can get instant feedback,’ he said.” 3 Big Issues We…

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3.16.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Blueprint for a post-LMS, Part 4. “The problem is that faculty are mostly not trained, not compensated, and otherwise not rewarded for their teaching excellence. Becoming a better teacher requires time, effort, and thought, just as becoming a better scholar does. But even faculty at many so-called “teaching schools” are given precious little in the way of time or resources to practice their craft properly, never mind improving it. The main solution to this problem that the market has offered so far is “courseware,” which you can think…

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3.9.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The Unintended Consequences of Borrowing Business Tools to Run a University. “At Lawrence we gain important insights working with very talented advisers from the business world to lower our utility costs, to design spaces that inspire learning and community, to improve the way we describe what we offer to prospective students, to increase the efficiency and quality of our administrative services, and so on. But to sustain the particular quality of education we provide, we must take care that those efforts do not divert us from essential conversations…

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3.2.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Do the Loudest ‘Expert’ Voices on Education Have the Least Expertise? “The researchers identified a striking disconnect between academic expertise and media influence. Among their key findings: Possession of a doctoral degree was, on average, associated with 67 percent fewer blog citations, 60 percent fewer newspaper mentions, and a lower Klout Score. Affiliation with a policy or advocacy organization substantially increased media presence. People associated with the American Enterprise Institute, for example, were, all else equal, nearly 2.5 times as likely as others to be cited in education…

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2.23.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. e-Literate TV Case Study Preview: Middlebury College. “We really weren’t sure what we would find once we arrived on campus with the cameras. Some of what we found there was not surprising. In a school with a student/teacher ratio of 8.6 to 1, we found strong student/teacher relationships and empowered, creative students. Understandably, we heard concerns that introducing technology into this environment would depersonalize education. But we also heard great dialogues between students and teachers about what “personalized” really means to students who have grown up with the internet….

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2.16.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Three Reasons College Matters for Social Mobility. “Parents pass on their educational advantage to the next generation. Almost half of the children born to fathers in the top quintile of educational attainment (in our analysis, possessing at least an associate’s degree) are in the top quintile of educational attainment themselves as adults” The Rich Man’s Dropout Club. “For Mr. Gu and other members of that first class of fellows, their experiences have been neither as dire nor as dramatically successful as observers on both sides predicted. While many…

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2.9.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Half of High-risk Students Coming Up Empty. “Rosenbaum’s report statistically sketches earnings for students based on whether they started school at a two-year or four-year college. It finds varying payoffs for students who earn credentials that range from graduate degrees to certificates, but no earnings payoff for students who have completed ‘some college.’” Big Data. Big Obstacles. “However, what should be an opportunity for social science is now threatened by a three-headed monster of privatization, amateurization, and Balkanization. A coordinated public effort is needed to overcome all…

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2.2.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. The Day the Purpose of College Changed. “The Times was giving voice to the ideal of liberal education, in which college is a vehicle for intellectual development, for cultivating a flexible mind, and, no matter the focus of study, for fostering a broad set of knowledge and skills whose value is not always immediately apparent. Reagan was staking out a competing vision. Learning for learning’s sake might be nice, but the rest of us shouldn’t have to pay for it. A higher education should prepare students for jobs. Those two…

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1.26.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Teach or Perish. “But no decision we ever made could have been more catastrophic than this one: Somewhere along the way, we spiritually and emotionally disengaged from teaching and mentoring students. The decision—which certainly hasn’t ingratiated us to the job-seeking generation—has resulted in one whopper of a contradiction. While teaching undergraduates is, normally, a large part of a professor’s job, success in our field is correlated with a professor’s ability to avoid teaching undergraduates. It follows from this contradiction that the more accomplished the scholar, the less she or…

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1.19.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Obama Proposes New Technical Training Fund. “In addition to its tuition-free community college plan, the White House on Friday released a proposal for a new technical job-training fund. The new money would build on a similar $2-billion workforce grant program aimed at two-year colleges, which expired last year. The president wants the federal government to pay for the creation of 100 new job centers around the country. The focus of the centers would be to ‘help high-potential, low-wage workers gain the skills to work into growing fields with significant…

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1.12.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. 5 Things Colleges Can Expect From Congress in 2015. “Funding will remain tight. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the new majority leader, has promised a return to “regular order” on appropriations, so spending bills are passed on time and another government shutdown is not risked. But budgets will remain tight, especially once the latest round of across-the-board spending cuts, known as the sequester, is applied. In that context, the most colleges will be able to hope for are modest increases for research and student aid; most programs will have…

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From Textbooks to Electronic Course Materials: Toward Academic Specialization in the Web Era

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This posting comes forth as a New Year’s invitation. As Max Mark discussed previously, textbooks are undergoing immense scrutiny and transition. The genre originally came to prominence as an industrial-strength solution to the unprecedented expansion of students with the post-WWII GI Bill. Convenience, quality, and effective marketing tactics quickly helped establish a powerful niche. While the campus bookstore and used-book sales evolved as background providers, the genre emerged as a defacto teaching model for subsequent generations of professors. The Web, however, is altering that comfortable pattern. The medium surfaces disruptive technological prospects, but also highlights lingering economic and…

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1.5.15 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Year-end Updates on e-Literate News Posts. “For my final 2014 post, I thought it would be interesting to provide year-end updates to some news posts on e-Literate over the past year. You’ll notice that there is somewhat of an emphasis on negative stories or implications. For most positive stories, companies and institutions are typically all too happy to send out press releases with the associated media paraphrasing, and we have little need here to cover as news. The following non-exhaustive list is in date order.” Harmonizing Learning and…

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12.29.14 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Moving Community College Graduates Toward a Four-Year Degree. “Whatever the reasons for obstacles in the student transfer pathway, there is a central question to address. In the discussions on how to improve community college participation and transfer, what is best for the students who seek to transfer? Put another way, what if the focus was less on the process? What if the focus was on the students? One especially innovative approach may be to save students ‘one soul at a time.’ We know that students want to transfer…

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12.22.14 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Vendors as Traditional Revolutionaries. “All of which brings me back to a single point: If you want better educational technology, then work to make sure that your colleagues in your campus community are asking for the things that you think would make educational technology better. If 40% rather than 4% of assignments created by your colleagues were on the open web, then learning platforms like LMSs would look and work differently. I guarantee it. Likewise, as long as most educators tend to use the technology to reproduce existing…

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12.15.14 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. An Aging America: Higher Education’s New Frontier. “At a time when traditional “retirement” increasingly marks the beginning of a new phase of work (whether by choice, necessity, or some combination of the two), millions will need help if they are to make a successful transition. Looking toward another two, three, or even four decades of healthy active life, many people are eager to gain new skills and the credentials that will help them move into a new work-life chapter. Like students of traditional college age, they also will…

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12.8.14 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. Students’ Long Paths to Completion Carry Major Financial Consequences. “Even if they could afford to tackle 15 hours per semester, that could be overwhelming for students with weak academic backgrounds, including many low-income and minority students, or for older adults who haven’t been in a classroom in decades, some educators worry. That’s especially true if prerequisite remediation is cut, they say. In addition to offering remediation alongside, instead of before, most college-level classes, Complete College America has been promoting a plan it calls Guided Pathways to Success, or…

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11.24.14 Higher Ed Weekly Read: Articles Worth Reviewing

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Here are some industry articles that caught our eye recently. For-profit universities are not inherently bad. “To this point, for-profit universities have, by and large, been all about teaching and have had little to do with research, sometimes actively discouraging it. … For-profits can’t succeed in traditional scientific research, but they could invest in something much more valuable to the typical undergraduate: cooperative research aimed at student needs. It could range from learning how to develop a market plan, to survey research, to elementary metrology, to handling research medical lab specimens, to developing code that someone can actually…

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Ed Map products have always incorporated advisory services. This blog, drawing on leading resources and industry thought leaders, is a natural expansion of the scope and impact of those insights and advice.

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